Take tea and talk with ‘Vincent and me’ artist

FERTILE FIELDS: Artwork by artists and filmmaker Michael Rubbo. Image: Michael Rubbo

BEECHWORTH Arts Council is pleased to support Quercus Beechworth’s morning tea on Thursday – April 12 – with brothers Michael and Mark Rubbo.

Michael is promoting his book ‘Travel with my Art’ – an amazing life told through Michael’s gorgeous paintings. Mark is Readings Bookstores’ managing director.

The talented and creative brothers were featured in the The Age Good Weekend in ‘The two of us’ on January 27 this year.

Quercus and the Arts Council would love you to join us for morning tea at 11am at what will be a delightful excursion through story telling, art and conversation in the garden at 30 Ford Street. Please let Quercus know if you’ll be attending by calling 03 5728 2386 or email. You might also forward this post to others who could be interested.

Go to Michael Rubbo for more information about Michael and his work.

Creativity shines at fair

FINE YARN: Work by Beechworth spinner and weaver Rose Gardner at Golden Art Fair 2018. Photo: Jamie Kronborg

BEECHWORTH Arts Council’s inaugural ‘Golden Art Fair’ opens on Easter Saturday in association with the community’s Golden Horseshoes Festival.

The invitation fair features works by Beechworth sculptor, painter and installation artist Jo Voigt, spinner and weaver Rose Gardner, printmaker Chris Dormer, artist and illustrator H. Fish, painters Inga Hanover, Tania Sutton and Kay Hampton, jeweller and painter Judy Hawking-Burnett, photographers Pamela Thomas and Holly Borschman, textile artist Maureen Cooper, Goulburn and North East Arts Alliance Wangaratta members Jacquie Coupe, Helen Hill, Kathy Whelan and Maggie Hollins, and Yackandandah basket-maker Jan Clements.

The fair – with demonstrations by Rose, Kay, Tania and Chris – will be open daily in Beechworth Soldiers’ Memorial Hall between 10am and 4pm. It runs until Easter Monday.

Participating artists

Basketwork by Yackandandah’s Jan Clements.

Print works by Beechworth’s Chris Dormer.

Photography by Beechworth’s Holly Borschman.

 

Golden opportunity: Burke wants ball-makers

HORSEPOWER: Billson’s Brewery’s Nathan Cowan and Burke Museum’s Cameron Auty clean the National Trust Victoria’s heavy waggonette in Beechworth in October last year. Photo: Jamie Kronborg

BEECHWORTH’S Burke Museum has put out a call for helpers to make papiermâché balls in Beechworth tomorrow (Thursday, March 22) for its Golden Horseshoes Festival float.

The museum entry for the festival’s Easter Saturday grand parade is themed on a colonial-era gold escort and will feature the 50-centimetre diameter balls to represent the extraordinary quantity of gold found in Beechworth after the first discovery in 1852. The balls are modelled on one in the museum, made from steel, which is equivalent to one imperial ton of gold.

On today’s bullion market the total weight of 153 tons officially recovered from Beechworth and Stanley alluvial fields and diggings would be worth more than $8 billion.

The ball-making working bee will be held at Pat Doyle’s house at 148 High Street between 10am and 5pm. Burke Museum and Beechworth historic precinct and Indigo heritage manager Cameron Auty said all volunteers would be welcomed at any time and could let him know by message or text to 0400 558 866 of their intended help.

Another feature of this year’s Horseshoes festival will be a display in the historic precinct of vehicles from the National Trust Victoria’s Beechworth carriage collection, which is usually housed at Billson’s Brewery.

The collection includes a Beechworth-built Victorian-era hearse and a heavy waggonette once owned by colonial pastoralist James Tyson, about whom poet Andrew ‘Banjo’ Paterson wrote a poem, ‘T.Y.S.O.N.’, and which is said to have been used to carry NSW governor Lord Victor Jersey in 1892 on a tour in the western Riverina. Tyson died one of the world’s richest men in 1898, leaving an estate valued at more than £2 million – equivalent to about $285m today.

Sculptor ships a message

RECYCLING: Beechworth sculptor Jo Voigt is seeking more PET bottles to complete her ‘Liquid gold’ installation for Beechworth Arts Council’s Golden Art Fair which opens on Easter Saturday. Photo: Jamie Kronborg

BEECHWORTH sculptor Jo Voigt is chasing contributions of clean, recyclable plastic drink bottles for a major installation she’s creating for next week’s Golden Horseshoes Festival’s Golden Art Fair.

Jo is using the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles and chicken-wire netting to build a large art piece called ‘Liquid gold’. It will feature at the entrance to the fair in Beechworth Soldiers’ Memorial Hall which is expected to be a major drawcard from March 31 to April 2 during the town’s Golden Horseshoes’ Easter festival.

Jo said the work would point to the high intrinsic cost and environmental costs of bottled water, which has been at the heart of a contentious campaign in the Stanley community in the past four years.

The community has wanted to protect its groundwater for productive agricultural use but late last year the Victorian Appeal Court rejected its bid to have a decision by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal that allowed water to be taken for bottling overturned.

Jo said the installation also tapped bottles’ centuries-old use as a means by which someone in distress could launch a message of help or rescue.

Golden Art Fair will feature smaller works by Jo and other North East artists will also participate, including spinner and weaver Rose Gardner, Beechworth printmaker Chris Dormer, Goulburn and North East Arts Alliance members Jacquie Coupe, Isobelle Sirianni, Kathy Whelan and Maggie Hollins, artist and illustrator H. Fish, painters Inga Hanover, Tania Sutton and Kay Hampton, photographers Pamela Thomas and Holly Borschman, basket-maker Jan Clements and quilter Maureen Cooper.

The fair will be open daily between 10am and 4pm. Bottles can be left in wheelie bins near Splatoons’ cartoon shop in Beechworth’s High Street.

See http://www.beechworthgoldenhorseshoes.com.au/program for more information.

Young photographer fronts Golden Art Fair

TALENTED: Holly Borschman (front) with Beechworth Secondary College fellow 2017 VCE art students Indigo Rowe and Elvie Rooney and art teacher Nina Machielse Hunt within a montage of Holly’s VCE photographic entries. Photo: Jamie Kronborg

AN emerging Beechworth photographer and a frontier installation sculptor are among North East artists and crafters who will demonstrate arts practice and show works at Beechworth Arts Council’s inaugural ‘Golden Art Fair’ during Easter.

VCE 2017 graduate Holly Borschman and established sculptor Jo Voigt are two among 12 who have been invited to show representative works from their portfolios during the town’s annual Golden Horseshoes Festival.

They will be joined by Goulburn and North East Arts Alliance members Kathy Whelan, Jacquie Coupe, Isobelle Sirianni and Maggie Hollins, Beechworth printmaker Chris Dormer, spinner and weaver Rose Gardner, artist and illustrator H. Fish, and painters Inga Hanover and Kay Hampton at the three-day fair in Beechworth Soldiers’ Memorial Hall.

Quilter Maureen Cooper, painter Tania Sutton, photographer Pamela Thomas and basket-maker Jan Clements complete the line-up.

Jo will also use hundreds of recyclable polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles to create a major installation through which people will walk to enter the fair.

It is to be called ‘Liquid gold’ and will interpret the high intrinsic and environmental costs of bottled water, which often retails well above the pump price of petrol, yet is an elemental compound almost freely available from a tap and vital for life, farming and food. The fair will be open March 31-April 2 between 10am and 4pm.

Golden Horseshoes celebrates Ovens goldfield miners’ hard-won right to elect their first Victorian parliamentary representative in 1855 and is Beechworth’s major festival of the year.

It attracts up to 20,000 people for numerous events in the town’s historic heart, including a grand parade on Ford Street on Easter Saturday afternoon.

See http://www.beechworthgoldenhorseshoes.com.au/program or beechworthartscouncil.org.au for more information.

Spring Arts flower in Beechworth

EXPRESSION: Spring Arts 2017 program cover. ARTWORK: Alicia Marshall

BEECHWORTH Arts Council’s month-long Spring Arts 2017 celebration of visual arts is blooming as November opens.

The program in the historic Indigo community starts with a weekend of open studios on November 4-5 — and with another artist also opening her mountainside studio near Tawonga — in the wake of an exhibition by King Valley artist Anita Laurance in Milawa’s Off Centre Gallery from November 3. Michael Ashby opens Under a blue sky on November 5 and it runs until December 4.

Les trois — an exhibition of printworks by Beechworth artists Chris Dormer and Tania Sutton and Stanley artist Janet Sutherland — opens at Indigo Library Beechworth on November 8 and runs to November 26.

Another Beechworth artist, Therese Shanley, exhibits Rain and good weather in the historic confines of Old Beechworth Gaol, opening on November 10 and running for nine days 10:30am-3:00pm.

Works by Woolshed Valley artist Nina Machielse Hunt show in the 1858-built Old Stone Hall in Beechworth November 10-26. The abstract landscape painter’s Wild is the wind opens on November 18.

A lively discussion about inspiration and tension in regional and metropolitan art featuring leading curators and gallery directors takes place in Beechworth’s Old Stone Hall on November 11. The art chat participants include former Art Gallery of South Australia director and NGV curator Christopher Menz.

Art under the rotunda, an exhibition of works by children from Beechworth and St Joseph’s primary schools, Montessori School and Wooragee Primary School, runs in Beechworth’s Town Hall Gardens on November 12.

The personal landscape — a major group exhibition — will open in Beechworth Town Hall on November 15 and runs until November 26. It ill be opened by Indigo mayor Jenny O’Connor.

Mayday Hills Art Society marks the sesquicentenary of Beechworth Lunatic Asylum with a show of artists’ works from November 23 to December 3 at its gallery in the asylum grounds. The asylum opened in 1867. It became Beechworth Mental Hospital in the mid-20th century and closed in 1995.

Spring Arts also features workshops exploring abstraction and painting for beginners.

 

North East artists open studios

OPEN: A satin bowerbird’s bower on Three Mile Creek near Beechworth. IMAGE: Jamie Kronborg

NORTH East artists in Beechworth, Wooragee and Tawonga will open their studios this weekend to launch Beechworth Arts Council’s November-long Spring Arts 2017.

Visitors to the studios will be able to meet Beechworth’s Chris Dormer and Kay Hampton, Wooragee’s Catherine Stewart and Tawonga’s Bärbel Ullrich, discuss their creative practice and view their works.

Chris’s practice includes printmaking, etching, and collagraphs. Kay creates landscape and still life colour works in acrylic. Catherine creates paintings and works on paper. Bärbel’s practice includes printmaking, drawing and mixed media.

‘Art Roads’ series heads to Benalla

SINUOUS: Brett Whiteley’s ‘Marulan bird with rocks’ circa 1980. IMAGE: Art Gallery of NSW / Wendy Whiteley copyright

Beechworth Arts Council is encouraging members and friends to take to the tarmac and join the first of its ‘Art Roads’ series on March 18.

These self-drive, shared vehicle journeys are being planned across the year and will be led by Arts Council vice president and fine arts creative honours student Daren John Pope.

The first Art Roads drive will take in Benalla Art Gallery’s Brett Whitely exhibition ‘West of the divide’.

Participants will depart Beechworth post office at 9:30am for Wangaratta Art Gallery and Christine Johnson’s ‘Voyages Botanical’ exhibition and a spot of morning tea.

The ‘Art Roads’ caravan will then drive on to Benalla where the Whiteley exhibition features works from the late Sydney artist’s enduring connection with country west of the Great Dividing Range. Daren is hoping to organise a discussion about the Whiteleys with Benalla Art Gallery director Bryony Nainby for Art Roads’ travellers. He will also provide commentary on the works.

Benalla Art Gallery has a lovely cafe for those who want to lunch. Alternatively, the adjacent Benalla Botanical Gardens offer wonderful options for picnicking.

Car-pooling is encouraged. If you’d like to join Art Roads #1 or can offer seats in your car please email Daren by March 12.

Dark art on stage

DARK: Nick Ravenswood and Gareth Skinner in ‘The Baby Farmer’

Beechworth’s former asylum at Mayday Hills is to become the setting for the dark art of theatre on March 17-18.

Direct from the Adelaide Fringe Festival, Nick Ravenswood and Gareth Skinner from Melbourne’s The Laudanum Project present in a variety of media the story of a helpless child and her unbalanced mother against an ever-shifting musical tapestry that reveals desinty, lost innocence and the nature of evil.

The Laudanum Project has shocked audiences since 2009, combining the darkest concepts with the best of writing, performance and music.

Artwork from artist Chloe Neath will be exhibited with the performance – intricately detailed works in charcoal on brown paper – together with a book.

Venue
Mayday Hills Village Ι March 17-18, 2017 Ι 8:00pm for 9:00pm start Ι Ticket: $40 book it

Information
The Laudanum Project

Digging into book publishing

Anne Vale’s Writers, Readers and Poets’ Weekend workshop will take place at Beechworth’s Mayday Hills, where Beechworth Treescape Group will lead a walk and readings ‘into the woods’ among Mayday’s National Trust-listed tree collection.

Anne Vale’s academic and practical interests in Australian design, influential women and gardening coalesced when she wrote a guidebook about ‘Durrol’, a significant garden near Mount Macedon.

The Allen family in 1932 commissioned Edna Walling – gardener, landscape designer, photographer and writer – to plan a small enclosed garden within the larger grounds laid out in the earlier years of the twentieth century. Walling became the subject of an entry Anne wrote, while a University of Melbourne lecturer in garden history and design, for The encyclopedia of women and leadership in twentieth century Australia, and demonstrates that Walling’s influence persists today, more than 40 years after her death.

Anne, in Walling’s footsteps, has written three books and the most recent of these, Influential Australian garden people and their stories, was self-published. The former Victorian branch chair of the Australian Garden History Society – and, like Walling, a skilled garden photographer – says it has been the most successful of her publishing experience.

Participants in Anne’s Beechworth Writers, Readers and Poets’ Weekend workshop on Sunday, February 12 will learn about writing and preparing a book for publication, negotiating a printing contract, and taking – profitably – a book to market.
Participation: $50 | book it | presenter information